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Is Li-Fi Gaining Momentum as an Alternative Beyond 5G?

I remember first talking about LiFi back in 2011, but since then things have come a long way. We discussed it being adopted by IEEE in a post couple of years back. IEEE 802.11 Light Communication (LC) TG which is working on 802.11 bb, is also called the Task Group "bb" (TGbb) and is focused on introducing necessary changes to the base IEEE 802.11 Stds to enable communications in the light medium.



In another post last year, we discussed that even though a lot of terms like LiFi, VLC, etc., are used interchangeably, they all have subtle differences.

Vodafone Deutschland and Signify (formerly Philips Lighting) announced that they are joining forces to interlink the two communication technologies 5G and LiFi, providing their customers with more speed and better mobile broadband connectivity:

The collaboration aims to develop applications, use cases and solutions that deliver secure and reliable two-way wireless communication at speeds well beyond traditional wireless technologies such as Wi-Fi and Bluetooth. Vodafone Deutschland is showcasing the benefits of combining the two technologies during the IEEE 5G Summit in Dresden.

Together, the two companies will explore and develop ways in which LiFi technology in local networks will be used in conjunction with 5G, so that Vodafone and other customers can benefit even more than before from the speed of those new technologies.

Under the name of Trulifi, Signify recently introduced a LiFi system that uses light waves instead of radio signals (such as WiFi, 4G/5G, Bluetooth, etc) to provide wireless data transmission and reception technology, which can be built into Philips-branded luminaires. It utilizes the lighting infrastructure to provide reliable and secure high-speed broadband connectivity up to 250 Mbps.

The combination of 5G and LiFi also offers advantages for industrial customers and the Internet of Things. It enables reliable and secure high-speed wireless communication with low latency in areas where certain radio frequencies are performing poorly due to critical environments or when wireless communications are not allowed at all due to safety regulations. In addition, fault-tolerant systems and services are better equipped to withstand network outages - the two communication technologies can be ubiquitous through inter-system handovers. 

Also conceivable are applications in autonomous driving where vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) and vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2X) networks enable direct communication between vehicles and the environment in order to increase safety and comfort in road traffic. The basis for connecting devices, machines and vehicles is a fixed point-to-point network that acts as a "wireless cable" and complements the Trulifi range.

I haven't heard much more since the announcement but here is a video from Signify



This week, ITU-T SG 15 is discussing "G.vlc: Consideration of new use cases and requirement on LiFi technology". We will have to wait for the details but one of the interesting things that the report highlights is that there are multiple standards working on light communications standards as shown in the table below.
All we can say right now is that this technology holds a lot of potential and has a fantastic future ahead.

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