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Increasing 5G Coverage and Capacity with OPRA (Orthogonal Polarization Reuse Antenna)

Efforts to increase capacity and extend coverage have continued through antenna technology advancements. Increasing capacity by dual orthogonal polarization technology and extending coverage by narrow multi-beam are the best examples. However, dual orthogonal polarization technology results in deterioration of capacity due to correlation by the overlap of polarization in multiple MIMO environments, and narrow multi-beam technology has a limitation that extends coverage. However, capacity increases are low due to the correlation between antenna polarizations. The limitations of these technologies occur because the same polarization is used in the same space, at the same time, and at the same frequency.

In a new whitepaper, KMW announced that they have implemented OPRA that has applied Orthogonal Polarization Reuse to increase capacity and extend coverage simultaneously. KMW is ready to offer a variety of RU products powered by OPRA technology to global partners and customers.

Orthogonal Polarization Reuse, a technique that reuses different polarizations by separating time, space, and frequency, is a new paradigm that satisfies capacity increase and coverage extension by reducing correlation through existing polarization.

OPRA is an Orthogonal Polarization Reuse technology that uses different dual orthogonal polarizations. The representative polarizations used are Slant 45°(±45°) polarization and Vertical / Horizontal(V/H) polarization. OPRA reuses different dual orthogonal polarizations by separating time, space, and frequency to reduce correlation by polarization and increasing capacity, and extending coverage.

OPRA reuses different orthogonal polarizations on multi-beam, significantly reducing the correlation between beams, and increasing capacity by 36% and coverage by 39%. This OPRA technology can be implemented in both the RF domain and digital domain.

OPRA technology gives operators the ability to achieve increased capacity and extended coverage at a low investment cost, and paramountly reducing CapEx and OpEx. 

The whitepaper is available from here.

Here is a promotional video from KMW via RCR Wireless:

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