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StarHub's SmartPTT Push-to-talk over Cellular (PTToC) Solution

Back in November, the Singaporean MNO StarHub announced the launch of Singapore’s first 5G-capable mission critical communications solution, enabling enterprises and government agencies to communicate with specified groups of people simply by pressing a Push-to-Talk (PTT) button. 

A press release said:

Named StarHub SmartPTT, the new solution sets up an encrypted enterprise-grade network over StarHub 5G and 4G connectivity, for identified mobile phones to function just like walkie-talkies or two-way radios – boosted with crystal-clear quality, unlimited range nationwide, and first-of-its-kind ‘live’ video feeds.

StarHub SmartPTT is a one-stop solution comprising island wide 5G/4G connectivity, ruggedised PTT devices, customisable user application, training, and comprehensive after-sales support with guaranteed response times. Customers just need to liaise with a single party for all of their instant and critical communication needs.

In addition, the solution offers a dispatch console for organisations to integrate voice, video, instant messaging, and CCTV feeds. Through this unified web interface, dispatchers can in real-time manage PTT groups and services, listen in to conversations, monitor video feeds, define geo-fencing limits and alarms, and activate voice recording.

With assured Quality of Service on StarHub SmartPTT, all PTT calls will always be given dedicated bandwidth and treated as top priority traffic. Even if there is network congestion, users will be able to talk, share videos, and text one another with no impact to service.

Starting today, customers can pair StarHub SmartPTT with the RugGear RG360 phone, which comes with a large dedicated PTT button, noise-cancelling dual microphones, and powerful front-facing speaker. Featuring 18 hours of battery life, this Android phone has the highest dust- and water-proof rating of IP68 and is MIL-STD-810H certified. Ruggedised 5G phones models are expected to reach Singapore shores next year.

StarHub SmartPTT is suitable for use across various industries, including public safety, aviation, construction, healthcare, hospitality, manufacturing, and transportation, among others. 

Details are available on their page here. You can also download SmartPTT Factsheet here. The video below is a good advertisement of the solution.

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